Mark Haddon’s The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time – A Review

Gloriously eccentric and wonderfully intelligent. – The Boston Globe

How far will you go to solve a neighborhood murder?

Perhaps not that far. Most likely not at all.

Murder is dangerous. And dangerous things are bound to get you in trouble. Or your family. Or friends. Even the innocent lives of those who become aware of your quest to solving the mystery.

But 15-year old Christopher John Francis Boone believed in the importance of solving this particular murder – the bloody demise of their neighbor’s dog, Wellington.

A Personal Take

This is an interesting read that combines humor and wit in an easy-to-follow storyline. It’s that type of book that you can finish in one sitting and that which can be hard to put down once you get yourself at ease with Christopher.

I find his character interesting, weird at so many points, but definitely a likable kid. Five simple facts about him include:

He is a Math prodigy. And he knows it. 

And that is why I am good at chess and maths and logic, because most people are almost blind and they don’t see most things and there is lots of spare capacity in their heads and it is filled with things which aren’t connected and are silly, like, “I’m worried that I might have left the gas cooker on.”

He finds people confusing. For two reasons according to him:

  • Because ‘people do a lot of talking without using any words’
  • ‘ people often talk using metaphors.

He hates the color yellow.

It’s unlikely for him to lie. He doesn’t lie.

This is another reason why I don’t like proper novels, because they are lies about things which didn’t happen and they make me feel shake and scared.

He doesn’t like to be touched. Nor shouted at.

What started as an innocent quest for a kid to solve a dog’s murder is really a story of family, acceptance, and reconciliation. It’s a nice read that leaves me a feeling of gratitude.

We can learn a thing or two from Christopher. Few of which, are those we often take for granted.

 

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