Book Review: Nothing Lasts Forever by Sidney Sheldon

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This is another one of those books that we all can finish in one-sitting, nonstop reading.

Nothing lasts forever is an easy-to-follow storyline with characters that represent varied and distinct personalities that many might find easy to relate. Unlike a number of medical drama that mostly includes suspense, this presents a fascinating mixture of romance, family story, and office politics all meshed around our main characters’ predicaments.

Common but at the same time complex story conflict

This story is set in a time when female doctors are viewed as inferior professionals compared to their male counterparts. They aren’t revered as much as their male counterparts and are usually the subject of harassment and bullying. Nothing new, really.

But it becomes interesting by looking at the backstory of the main characters:

Dr. Paige Taylor who grew up with her father – a WHO (World Health Organization) doctor who traveled around the world, servicing tribes and communities with no access to hospital facilities. These frequent travels enabled Paige to learn various local dialects while enhancing her cultural knowledge.

Dr. Kat Hunter, a runaway teen who was abused by her stepfather. She found hope on her aunt’s constant encouragement and her love for her little brother, Mike. Never the ‘people person,’ Kat pretty much did well on her own – eventually braving the profession dominated by men.

Dr. Honey  Taft who was considered inferior among her family of over-achievers. The constant pressure to excel on something made her succumb to unconventional methods to get what she needs. Her natural warm and vulnerable bearing became an asset – something which she soon learned to be a double-edged sword.

Amidst their differences, they all somehow managed to stay together, drawing strength from their common prejudice and excelling well on their respective fields.

But even at that, they never really fully knew who was who.

Honey spoke very little. There’s a shyness about her, Paige thought. She’s vulnerable. Some man in Memphis probably broke her heart.

Paige looked at Kat. Self-confident. Great dignity. I like the way she speaks. You can tell she came from a good family.

Meanwhile, Kat was studying Paige. A rich girl who never had to work for anything in her life. She’s gotten by on her looks.

Honey was looking at the two of them. They’re so confident, so sure of themselves. They’re going to have an easy time of it.

They were all mistaken.

Strong individuality

What I think drove the story forward is the strong individuality of the characters more than that of the plot’s twists and turns. The revelations weren’t that surprising, and few were predictable, but thinking of how Paige, Kat, and Honey would react on the situations thrown at them kept me hooked.

They value their profession, but their priority lists don’t necessarily show it’s the only thing that matters.

Paige has her romantic idealism. Kat has her brother. And Honey has her family.  Personal factors that can always throw even the most straight-headed personality out of balance. One just has to place them in peril.

And Sidney Sheldon did just that.

It’s because these characters were very well crafted that makes them real and memorable. You can get the sequence of events jumbled up, but you’ll forever remember how each character acted.

RATING:

⭐ ⭐ ⭐ / 5

MOOD:

😀

Get your copy from Book Depository! 

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